1356: The English Capture the King of France during the Battle of Poitiers

1356: The English Capture the King of France during the Battle of Poitiers
Photo Credit To Wikipedia Commons

Story Highlights

  • Historical event:
  • 19 September 1356
  • The English army was led by the so-called Black Prince, the eldest son of the former King Edward III, and designated successor who held the title of Prince of Wales.

This day in 1356 marked the Battle of Poitiers in France during the Hundred Years’ War.

It is interesting to note that the British even captured John II of France or John the Good (French: Jean le Bon), who was monarch of the House of Valois.

At the time, the English were extremely superior compared to the French. Also, the Great Plague had hit Europe just a few years earlier, so it was generally very difficult time for the French population.

The English army was led by the so-called Black Prince, the eldest son of the former King Edward III, and the designated successor. “Black Prince” held the title of Prince of Wales and Duke of Cornwall, and became famous for several battles in France (but, he died before his father, and didn’t become king).

The English had a considerable advantage on the battlefield due to their archers who used longbows.

They played a major role in the Battle of Poitiers, but the English cavalry and infantry were more important, and mostly recruited from the French territories under English rule.

The English captured the French king and his entourage at the end of the battle. The king’s son Philip (Duke of Burgundy) was also captured, and the king’s cousin (the Duke of Bourbon) was killed.

The English brought John II of France to London, and they held him captive for several years. He was released after signing an important contract.

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