20.10.

1943: Junkers Ju 390: Nazi Plane for Bombing New York

1943: Junkers Ju 390: Nazi Plane for Bombing New York
Photo Credit To http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Junkers_JU-390_in_flight.jpg

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  • historical event:
  • Its six engines were produced by the BMW factory. Each engine had as many as 14 cylinders which were arranged in a star-shaped pattern, and could achieve up to 1,700 hp. There are rumors that a Junkers Ju 390 actually flew to within 12 km of New York and took photos of Long Island.

This day marked the maiden flight of the German heavy bomber, the Junkers Ju 390, designed to attack the USA. The bomber had as many as six engines, a large wingspan (over 50 meters) and a maximum takeoff mass of 75,500 kilograms.

The Ju 390 had an extremely long range – 9,700 km, which allowed it to reach the eastern coast of the USA (New York, Washington, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore) from Germany. Its six engines were designed by the BMW factory. Each engine had as many as 14 cylinders which were arranged in a star-shaped pattern, and could achieve up to 1,700 hp. Therefore, the total power of the bomber amounted to 10,200 hp.

The prototype of the Ju 390 bomber was produced in the Junkers factory in the German city of Dessau (between Berlin and Leipzig). The Junkers factory originally produced radiators and boilers, and only later began making airplanes. It is interesting that the factory is currently again producing central heating systems, but has stopped producing aircraft.

The Ju 390 was part of the so-called Amerika-Bomber project. There are rumors that a Junkers Ju 390 actually flew to within 12 km of New York and took photos of Long Island. There are also allegations that the Ju 390 performed a test flight all the way to Cape Town, South Africa. Many, however, dispute the veracity of these claims. In any case, the Amerika-Bomber project did not find fertile ground in Nazi Germany, and these bombers didn’t perform a single attack on the continental USA.

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