17.01.

1793: Who Condemned French King Louis XVI to the Guillotine?

1793: Who Condemned French King Louis XVI to the Guillotine?
Photo Credit To https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/14/ExaminationLouistheLast.jpg

Even the king’s close cousin, the Duke of Orleans, was among those who voted for the king’s death. Others who voted for his death included Robespierre, Marat, Danton, and the famous painter Jacques-Louis David.

On this day the French revolutionary politicians condemned the King Louis XVI to death because he had, they claimed, betrayed the country and committed crimes against the state. This conviction of the king was brought by the highest political authority in France at that time – the so-called National Convention – a kind of parliament that also had executive power as the state government.

King Louis XVI was in a bad position from the beginning of the trial because he really did cooperate with foreign rulers in the attempt to overthrow the revolutionary government in France. King was represented by his lawyers – Count de Sèze, nobleman de Malesherbes (son of the famous Chancellor of France), and François Tronchet. The lawyers skillfully presented speeches in the king’s favor, but it was all in vein. The king vas voted guilty by as much as 693 deputies, and not one voted for acquittal. The punishment for the king was to be decided next, and there was no accord in opinions about that.

Part of the Convent deputies were for the guillotine, but majority was against it. Many preferred for the king to be put in jail or exiled from the country. After multiple voting, the death sentence prevailed. Even the king’s close cousin, the Duke of Orleans, was among those who voted for the king’s death. Others who voted for his death included Robespierre, Marat, Danton, and the famous painter Jacques-Louis David. Only 4 days later, the king was executed by guillotine.

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