29.06.

A Russian peasant woman tried to kill the monk Raspucin in 1914.

A Russian peasant woman tried to kill the monk Raspucin in 1914.

After stabbing Raspucin, Guseva exclaimed: “I killed the Antichrist!” However, Raspućin did not die from being stabbed, but fled down the street, and Jina chased after him, trying to beat him.

On June 29, 1914, a Russian peasant, Jina Guseva, tried to kill the Russian mystical monk Grigory Raspuchin, who had a huge influence on the imperial family, by stabbing him in the stomach. It happened in Siberia, in the village of Pokrovskoje near the town of Tobolsk. Pokrovskoye was Rasputin’s native village and was inhabited by his wife and children, whom he came to visit when he was not at the Russian imperial court. Many Russians were envious of Rasputin because of his great influence on the imperial family, especially because they felt that he was exploiting that influence and negatively affecting the entire state. Namely, Raspućin came to the mercy of the emperor and empress because of his alleged mystical abilities. The emperor’s only son, Alexei, was a hemophiliac who was not helped by any therapy. The Empress believed that with Raspucin’s help, the boy prayed to God to stop the bleeding.

A great opposition arose against Rasputin’s connection with the emperor and empress. After stabbing Raspucin, Jina Guseva allegedly exclaimed: “I killed the Antichrist!” However, Raspućin did not die from being stabbed, but fled down the street, and Jina chased after him, trying to beat him. He repulsed her only with a blow to the face with a stick, after which she surrendered to the police. She was declared insane and placed in an asylum for the mentally disturbed. Raspucin lived for more than two years, when he was killed by a group of conspirators led by the aristocrat Prince Felix Yusupov.

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