08.09.

1941: The Siege of Leningrad – the Bloodiest Siege in Human History

1941: The Siege of Leningrad – the Bloodiest Siege in Human History
Photo Credit To Wikipedia Commons/ "RIAN archive 5634 Antiaircrafters guarding the sky of Leningrad" by RIA Novosti archive, image #5634 / David Trahtenberg / CC-BY-SA 3.0. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons.

Story Highlights

  • Historical event:
  • 8 September 1941
  • Thousands of people died every day due to hunger and lack of basic necessities. 4000 people died on Christmas Day in 1941. The roads across the frozen Lake Ladoga were used in order to re-establish food supply.

This day marked the beginning of the Siege of Leningrad, which lasted for almost 900 days.

Almost two million people died. When the last road to the city was severed (two million people lived in that area), it became clear that they had flour for only 25 days, and meat for only 22 days. It was necessary to find alternative sources of food, and people used almost everything (horses, cats, wallpapers etc.). The sewage system did not function.

Thousands of people died every day due to hunger and lack of basic things. 4000 people died on Christmas Day in 1941.

The roads across the frozen Lake Ladoga were used in order to re-establish food supply. People could drive food trucks only when the ice was 20 cm thick, and they also began the construction of the railroad.

The siege lasted until January, 1944. It was the bloodiest siege in human history.

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