07.09.

1940: Hitler’s “Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing” Sent to London

1940: Hitler’s “Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing” Sent to London
Photo Credit To Wikipedia Commons

Story Highlights

  • Historical event:
  • 7 September 1940
  • East London, the so-called East End (not far from the Olympic Center, which was completed in 2012) was attacked first. The commanders of German attacks were Field Marshal Hugo Sperrle (former commander of the Condor Legion in the Spanish Civil War), and Field Marshal Albert Kesselring (he was honored as Hitler's field marshal).

The first German bombing of London during World War II started on this day in the late afternoon.

East London, the so-called East End (not far from the Olympic Center, which was completed in 2012) was attacked first.

Namely, this part of London was the closest area to German bombers, and their military objective due to the port facilities and ships which were anchored there.

The operation was named “Loge” (after the deity Loki) and “Seeschlange” (“Sea Snake”).

The main commander of the German Air Force (the Luftwaffe) was Herman Göring, the fighter ace of World War I. Hitler gave him the rank of Reichsmarschall, and he became the highest-ranking officer in Germany.

It is interesting to note that the Germans didn’t use heavy bombers. They used the medium bomber which was called the “wolf in sheep’s clothing” (Heinkel He-111).

Namely, the British did not expect the bombing of civilian targets. About 400 people were killed during the first days of the attack. Ships were damaged or sunk.

The commanders of German attacks were Field Marshal Hugo Sperrle (former commander of the Condor Legion in the Spanish Civil War), and Field Marshal Albert Kesselring (he was honored as Hitler’s field marshal).

The Germans attacked London, and wanted the British to surrender themselves. But Prime Minister Churchill, who had come to power four months earlier, didn’t want to surrender.

In the end, Hitler waived his plan, and stopped the invasion of Britain (he also wanted to defeat Britain during air battles).

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