17.07.

1918: Russian Imperial Romanov Family Killed by the Bolsheviks

1918: Russian Imperial Romanov Family Killed by the Bolsheviks
Photo Credit To Wikipedia Commons/The Romanovs. From left to right: Olga, Maria, Nicholas II, Alexandra, Anastasia, Alexei, and Tatiana. Pictured at Livadia Palace in 1913

Story Highlights

  • Historical event
  • 17 July 1918
  • It seems that Lenin authorized their execution because he feared that Czechoslovakian“counterrevolutionary forces” would release the imperial family and conquer Yekaterinburg. Although there are various theories that the youngest daughter Anastasia survived the execution, they are not credible because her remains were identified in 2009.

On this day in 1918, the Bolsheviks killed the last Russian emperor Nicholas II, and his numerous family.

In 1917, Nicholas II abdicated on its own behalf, and on behalf of his son Alexei Nikolaevich, who suffered from hemophilia (due to that disorder, the family came into contact with Rasputin, who claimed to have powers of healing and prescience).

The Romanov family was held captive in Tsarskoye Selo, in Tobolsk (Siberia), and in Ekaterinburg (Yekaterinburg) near the Urals, approximately 1,700 kilometers from Moscow.

They were executed in Ipatiev House, which was named after its former owner – the engineer Ipatiev. A total of  11 people were killed:

 

– Emperor Nicholas II

– Empress Alexandra (Queen Victoria’s granddaughter)

– Grand Duchess Olga (22 years old)

– Grand Duchess Tatiana (21 years old)

– Grand Duchess Maria (19 years old)

– Grand Duchess Anastasia (17 years old)

– Prince (Tsesarevich) Alexei (13 years old)

– Yevgeny Botkin (the court physician for Alexandra and Nicholas II)

– Anna Demidova (a maid in the service of Tsarina Alexandra)

– the family’s chef Ivan Kharitonov

– Aloysius Alexei Trupp (who was a footman and a Catholic).

 

It seems that Lenin authorized their execution because he feared that Czechoslovakian “counterrevolutionary forces” would release the imperial family and conquer Yekaterinburg.

Early in the morning, they were awakened by their executioners, who told them that they had to be moved to a “safer” place.

They went to the semi-basement room of the house they were staying in (the 6X5-foot room). A group of people armed with guns appeared in the basement, and started shooting at them.

The Empress and Grand Duchess Olga tried to cross themselves. There were some surviors, but one of the the executioners stabbed them with bayonets.

The dead bodies of the victims were thrown into Ganina Yama, 15 kilometers from Yekaterinburg.

Although there are various theories that the youngest daughter Anastasia survived the execution, they are not credible because her remains were identified in 2009.

Nicholas II of Russia, his wife Alexandra Feodorovna (Alix of Hesse), and their children were proclaimed saints by the Russian Orthodox Church.

Facebook Comments

Related posts