14.04.

1912: The Ice that Hit the Titanic was actually not Common in that Part of the Ocean

1912: The Ice that Hit the Titanic was actually not Common in that Part of the Ocean
Photo Credit To Wikipedia Commons

Story Highlights

  • Historical event:
  • 14 April 1912
  • It is interesting that in the year 1912, the Moon was the closest to Earth in the past 1,400 years, which could have caused a high tide that carried large pieces of ice to the south.

On this day, in the late night hours, the largest ship in the world at the time – the Titanic – struck an iceberg in the northern Atlantic Ocean.

At that moment she was about two-thirds the way from England to New York. That year, there was much ice in the northern Atlantic as the winter was mild, and the ice from the north broke off and floated on the sea.

It is interesting that in the year 1912, the Moon was the closest to Earth in the past 1,400 years, which could have caused a high tide that carried large pieces of ice to the south.

The fateful night was moonless. During the previous day, other ships repeatedly warned the Titanic about the presence of drifting ice, but the ship continued to steam ahead almost at maximum speed, in order to finish her first voyage as soon as possible.

The crew spotted the iceberg too late, and failed to avoid the collision. Water began to penetrate into 5 out of 16 ship compartments.

The Titanic could stay afloat with four compartments flooded, but not with five. The ship sank within 2 hours and 40 minutes, the next day early in the morning.

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