23.09.

1865: The Hungarian Baroness Orczy who Became a Famous Writer in England

1865: The Hungarian Baroness Orczy who Became a Famous Writer in England
Photo Credit To Wikipedia Commons

Story Highlights

  • Historical event:
  • 23 September 1865
  • Baroness Emma Orczy earned a lot of money due to her writing career, and could buy property in Monte Carlo.

Hungarian Baroness Emma Orczy, who later became a famous writer in the UK, was born on this day in 1865.

Her birth name was Emma Magdolna Rozália Mária Joseph Borbála Orczy de Orczi, and her Hungarian nickname was “Emmuska”.

She was born in Tarnaörs, in the area of present-day Hungary, about 70 kilometers east of Budapest. Her family held a baronial title, and owned a castle in the mentioned Tarnaörs. Her father was Baron Félix Orczy de Orczi, and his mother Countess Emma Wass de Szentegyed et Czego.

All legitimate children of Hungarian barons held baronial titles. Therefore, Baroness Emma Orczy held the title since her birth.

In 1880, when Emma was about 15 years old, her family moved to London. Emma then continued her education in England. She married an Englishman named Montague MacLean Barstow, and gave birth to their son, John Montague Orczy-Barstow.

Baroness Emma Orczy became a famous writer in the UK. She wrote many novels, and her stories about Scarlet Pimpernel (a fictional English baronet, named Percy Blakeney, who was saving people from the guillotine during the French Revolution) are the most popular. He was nicknamed Scarlet Pimpernel due to the flower which he used as his signature.

During her writing career (approximately 40 years), Baroness Orczy wrote a dozen novels about Scarlet Pimpernel, and many other books (historical fiction and criminology).

There were theater performances and films inspired by her books. She earned a lot of money due to her writing career, and could buy property in Monte Carlo.

Baroness Emma Orczy died in the town of Henley-on-Thames in England (the town lies on the River Thames, roughly between London and Oxford) in 1947.

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