12.03.

1270: Count Charles of Valois – Titular Emperor of Constantinople and Founder of the Valois Dynasty

1270: Count Charles of Valois – Titular Emperor of Constantinople and Founder of the Valois Dynasty
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Charles was the grandson of Louis IX, the only French king who became a saint of the Catholic Church.

Count Charles of Valois, titular emperor of the Latin Empire and the founder of the French royal Valois dynasty, was born on this day in 1270.

This dynasty was very important for French history, and reigned for a long time (from 1328 until 1589). All French kings from the Valois dynasty were direct descendants of Charles of Valois.

Charles of Valois was the son of French king Phillip II, but also had older brother who came before him in the line of succession. Thus the French crown bypassed Charles and went to Phillip IV the Fair, the ruler best known for his controversial role in the abolishment of the Knights Templar. Despite the fact that he failed to inherit the crown, Chales of Valois gathered an impressive collection of landholdings. One of them was the County of Valois in northern France, after which the dynasty got its name. The county’s seat of government was located in Crépy-en-Valois, some 50 km northeast of Paris, towards the current Belgian-French border.

Charles also came into possession of the counties of Alençon and Perche, and became the Count of Anjou and Maine through marriage. His second marriage was to Catherine of Courtenay, heiress of the last emperor of the Latin Empire, a state founded by the Crusaders on the territory of Constantinople. He therefore became the titular Emperor of the Latin Empire.

Charles of Valois died in Nogent-le-Roi, France, in 1325, aged 55.

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